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blub
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Joined: 12 Nov 2010
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Location: GBR
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:59 pm
Post subject: Phonological Conditioning?
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Hi everyone Smile
Could anyone explain to me what phonological conditioning is (if there is allomorphy, this may be the case, right!?)? The internet, unfortunately, hasn't been much help in making me understand it :/
and what is a phonological effect (to the stem of a noun, e.g. when a suffix is added)?
Thanks a lot for your help!! Smile
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Lobo
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Joined: 22 May 2010
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 4:21 pm
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Allomorphy might be conditioned morphologically or phonologically. A typical example of morphological conditioning is the past tense of the verb to be: I was, but you were. A typical example of phonological conditioning is the past tense of irregular verbs: I love+[d] and I play+[d], but I like+[t] and I invent[ɪd]. Any clearer? Smile
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blub
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 4:46 pm
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So... phonological conditioning is all about the change of the sound of the suffix??
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Lobo
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Joined: 22 May 2010
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2010 7:51 pm
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blub wrote: So... phonological conditioning is all about the change of the sound of the suffix??


Allomorphy is always about changing the sound of a morpheme, be it conditioned phonologically or morphologically. Phonological conditioning is about changing the sound because of its phonological context, while morphological conditioning is about other other reasons.

Just like in the example above example, you have a morpheme /d/ "past" change to /t/ if following a voiceless obstruent or to /ɪd/ if following an alveolar plosive.
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Dr.Htein Win



Joined: 06 Apr 2007
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Location: Myanmar
PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 1:31 am
Post subject: Morphology
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Phonetheme is one of the phonological conditions in Morphology. Phonetheme can change the meaning of words. In Myanmar linguistic literature, kyaw Aung San thar Sayadaw found phonetheme over 100 year ago. for example: pja pja is a kind of minimizers in colors of Myanmar Language.' hmai pja pja'
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