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colinmacl



Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 1
Location: Stirling, Scotland
PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 11:44 am
Post subject: Voiced / voiceless
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My googling keeps throwing up different answers, so I wondered if someone could set this straight for me.

Voiced consonants: b d g j l m n r v w y z
Voiceless consonants: c f h k p q s t x

I'm 99% sure that these lists are ok, but I'm not sure about q...

Also, can anyone explain why this distinction is important when learning to speak or read? I am teaching phonics to Japanese students and I am considering splitting the sounds into two groups (voiced and voiceless) when I teach them. Is this a wise thing to do, or is it not important and just complicating the issue?

Your thoughts are much appreciated.
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Corybobory
Chomsky


Joined: 21 Sep 2007
Posts: 1597
Location: London, UK (formerly Vancouver, Canada)
PostPosted: Fri Jun 05, 2009 5:10 pm
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Those lists are right Smile /q/ is a voiceless uvular stop.

As for how to group the phonics... I'm not sure. My students were Korean, and so we needed to practise differentiating between /p/ and /f/, and /b/ and /v/, so I tried to incorporate a lot of minimal pairs. I dont think there are many minimal pair distinctions for consonants you need to specially focus on with Japanese students, except /l/ /r/ of course and maybe /b/ /v/? It's those tricky vowels that cause the trouble! Smile
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paul.moore



Joined: 16 Jun 2009
Posts: 9
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 10:20 am
Post subject: the truth may vary
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It depends on what those sounds are like in the language you're thinking of...

It'd be easier to answer your question if you were using the IPA to represent those sounds. In many languages, for ex, a /y/ is not considered a prototypical voiced consonant but rather semi-vowel or semi-consonant.
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iambinary



Joined: 08 Aug 2009
Posts: 3
PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2009 12:00 pm
Post subject: neutral American
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Would those voiced and voiceless consonants be accurate for "standard American" or "neutral American"?
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Dennis
Chomsky


Joined: 30 Aug 2009
Posts: 2417
Location: U.S.
PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:07 pm
Post subject: Re: Voiced / voiceless
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colinmacl wrote: Also, can anyone explain why this distinction is important when learning to speak or read? I am teaching phonics to Japanese students and I am considering splitting the sounds into two groups (voiced and voiceless) when I teach them. Is this a wise thing to do


Japanese syllabaries have been constructed to clearly emphasize the relationship between voiced/unvoiced pairs of consonants. Since the Japanese are used to this relationship between consonants, it is quite useful to teach in such terms.
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ablyth
Good Linguist


Joined: 09 Aug 2009
Posts: 35
Location: Japan
PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:23 pm
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A great book you can use for your own reference, and for occasional handouts in class is English Pronunciation In Use, CUP. It includes a list in the back of 'problem sounds' that particular L1 groups having, including Japanese and Koreans.

To discern the difference between the two, voiced and unvoiced, I tell my students to put their fingers touching lightly on their voice boxes and to make the noice, then I ask which is voiced and unvoiced. It was with /s/ and /z/, and soft 'th' and voiced 'th', too.
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